Friday, September 6, 2019

Foundation Sire: Hohenstein

Here is the next installment of Warmblood Stallions of North America’s Foundation Friday.  Every other Friday we will be featuring a foundation sire - one who has been influential in the development of warmblood breeds. We pull from the incredible archive of The Horse Magazine, published by Chris Hector of Australia. Thank you, Chris, for permission to draw on your expertise!

1991–2013
167 cm
Black
Breeder: Harry Bartsch

Let Burkhard Wahler tell the tale: “So we raised him until he was two and then I could see, oh cripes, it’s a fantastic stallion, I would like to buy that one. ‘No’, said the owner, ‘no chance …” At the 2002 Trakehner Stallion Licensing in Neumunster, Germany, Hohenstein was awarded the title of 2002 Trakehner Stallion of the Year. … Hohenstein constantly produces top sport horses that are sold for high prices at the Elite Hanoverian auctions in Verden. …


To read the entire article, with pedigree, details of Hohenstein's sons and daughters, on the Horse Magazine website, click here.

There are a few of stallion descendants of Hohenstein in North America. Click on the following links to read about each of the ones on WarmbloodStallionsNA.com:

Hampton

E.H. Herzensdieb

Wednesday, August 28, 2019

Warmblood Stallions of North America Announces Devon Contest Winners!

SunnyDays foals:
Sonnentanz by Sir Gregory
and Slainte by Sezuan
We have two winners! Warmblood Stallions of North America's 2nd annual Dressage at Devon contest has just wrapped up, and we're happy to announce our two winners. Each winner receives tickets to all six days of competition.

Congratulations to:

Kathleen Richardson, owner of SunnyDays Hanoverians.

SunnyDays Hanoverians is small breeding operation which has produced 2 to 6 warmblood foals a year for the past 20 years, primarily Hanoverian. Kathleen is a member of the Hanoverian Verband, and has been active in the Eastern Canada Hanoverian Breeders Club, as a past Director, past President, and general factotum.

"We have a small farm, 50 acres, northeast of Toronto, Canada, where our horses live a pretty much outdoor life, as weather permits. I select my mares, and the stallions to whom I breed them, for temperament, rideability, and beauty of movement. I am a one-person operation, and handle all my girls and babies daily, so it is paramount that they be gentle and well mannered. Many of my babies have gone on to successful dressage careers, and a few have showed talent in jumping and eventing.

"Like most breeders I strive to learn more, and do better, and there is always lots to learn. I look forward to the Devon Breed Classes, to learn and enjoy at the same time."

July Urschel, Black Fox Farm.

July Urschel is an adult amateur dressage rider based out of Kentucky, and she owns "a boutique farm named Black Fox Farm.

"We are in the planning phase of our breeding operation. The Hanoverian is the breed in which we set our focus. We have a lovely Wolkentanz II mare that we hope to be the foundation of our program. I hope to contribute (through careful and wise breeding choices) to improving American-bred sporthorses.

"The breed show at Devon is the perfect place to for market research and networking. I look forward to seeing the youngsters and taking plenty of notes. I’m excited for the opportunity to watch the CDI as well!

"Thank you for hosting this wonderful contest!"

Dressage at Devon, September 24–29, 2019, is famous not only for drawing some of the finest competitors in North American dressage, but also for presenting the largest open breed show in the world. The breed show is held the first three days: Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday; with the performance division running Friday through Sunday. Warmblood Stallions of North America is proud to partner with Dressage at Devon to offer this opportunity to send North American breeders to Dressage at Devon 2019.

We wish both winners a wonderful and educational trip, and we look forward to reports and photos!

Monday, August 26, 2019

Update on Fragile Foal Syndrome on Noelle Floyd

by Anna Goebel

The Noelle Floyd website has just published an article on (Warmblood) Fragile Foal Syndrome. It includes the facts about WFFS that most of us have been familiar with since Mary Nuttall first loosed the bombshell in spring, 2018 that her foal was born with WFFS.

The author interviewed some of the people most closely concerned with that first dramatic story, including Mary, Natalie DiBerardinis of Hilltop Farm, and Nina Winand (who identified the mutation). They all have interesting things to say, looking back on the experience more than a year later.

For example, I'd never heard a complete description of what happened to Mary's foal before, which is included in this interview. It's even more horrific than I imagined. There are still breeders, even a few in the US, who really believe that because WFFS is rare, we really don't need to take any precautions. That it's "not a big deal," given how few affected foals are actually born. Most prominent among these is Paul Schockemöhle. According to the article, he is willing to gamble 10,000 euros to encourage breeders to take the risk.

I strongly agree with what I believe is the majority opinion - and least in the US - that one foal is too many. No foal should have to endure that, and no human should have to watch it happen either. If you can read this report (which not at all sensationalized - it doesn't need to be) and still believe that a few cases of WFFS are ok here and there, I'm afraid you've lost all claim to humane management practices.

I believe that one of the areas in which North American breeders can take pride is that they take horse welfare seriously. Very few are willing to ignore humane principles. As a group, we really do know that horses are not just "things" or commodities, but sentient creatures. One important thing we've learned from living a year with knowledge of WFFS is that there are still some breeders in Europe that just don't get it. Luckily we are an important market for them, so we can vote with our dollars and choose to do business with more responsible stallion owners.

Click here to read the full article on NoelleFloyd.com.

Saturday, August 24, 2019

British Elite Foals Bring £40,000 At Auction

Britain's breeding industry has been steadily making itself known, with British-bred horses doing well in competition and sales. The most recent success was apparent at the recent Bolesworth AES Elite Foal Auction, where two foals went for £40,000 each, approximately US$48,500. 

ASK Tinka is a filly by Casall ASK out of a Tinka's Boy mare. Cavalier HF is a colt out of a mare who is also British-bred, by Handel; Cavalier HF is by Diamant de Semilly.

The auction was held on August 16, 2019.

For more details, and photos, click here to read the Horse & Hound magazine article.

Friday, August 23, 2019

Foundation Sire: Heartbreaker

Here is the next installment of Warmblood Stallions of North America’s Foundation Friday.  Every other Friday we will be featuring a foundation sire - one who has been influential in the development of warmblood breeds. We pull from the incredible archive of The Horse Magazine, published by Chris Hector of Australia. Thank you, Chris, for permission to draw on your expertise!

1989–1968
167 cm
Bay
Breeder: P S Koopmans, Bozun (NL)

In 2007 Heartbreaker was declared a "Belgian Ambassador," and not surprisingly given the success of his offspring …

Like Voltaire, Heartbreaker is an exciting mix of German and French jumping lines, with a fair splash of Thoroughbred. ...
Heartbreaker is by Nimmerdor, out of a mare by the international showjumping stallion Silvano, who was started in jumping competitions ...


To read the entire article, with pedigree, details of Heartbreaker's sons and daughters, on the Horse Magazine website, click here.

There are a few of stallion descendants of Heartbreaker in North America. Click on the following links to read about each of the ones on WarmbloodStallionsNA.com:



Thursday, August 22, 2019

What We Can Learn from Emily Miles and the World Young Horse Championships

Editorial by Anna Goebel

I had been wondering how Emily Miles, a US rider, had fared at the World Young Horse Championships, since she didn't show up in the reports on the final results. Kenneth Braddick answers that question in an article on Dressage-News.com. Click here to read the article.

Emily took two horses, both owned by Leslie Waterman: Sole Mio and Daily Show. I had seen both at the North American Stallion Sport Test, where Sole Mio was the high-scoring dressage stallion. (Click here to read about that event.)

These are lovely stallions, and Emily Miles is one of the most beautiful dressage riders I have ever seen, so I was really curious to know how they did at the World Young Horse Championships. I didn't shell out for a subscription to ClipMyHorse.tv, so I was not able to watch the whole show, all the rides.

If you've followed the commentary of experts - click here for a list of links - you know that there are two prominent criticisms of the World Young Horse Championships. One is the "perceived domination by one entity," as Kenneth Braddick puts it. Chris Hector, of HorseMagazine.com, is more explicit: "...some have decided that the World Champs have really become a publicity stunt for Helgstrand dressage...." The other is the complaint that the judges reward extreme movement - movement that is so extreme that it is inappropriate for the ages of the horses. Both authors, for example, point to the all-out extended trot being highly rewarded by judges - even though it is the medium trot that is called for in the test. The top rides of last year certainly were the ones who pushed for everything they could get from their horses.

I would describe a competitive performance by Emily Miles as impressive, beautiful, harmonious, sympathetic, full of impulsion and athleticism, and a joy to watch. A German judge at the North American Stallion Test called her riding, "what dressage riding should look like." I would add that she is also effective: her horses go exactly as dressage horses should go.

I suspected that in Ermelo these qualities would not enough. If you ride a superlative medium trot, and the judges score it as if it were a defective extended trot - where does that leave you?

Emily Miles did not do well enough to make the top 15. Sure, I wasn't there, and I didn't see her rides. But she was proud of her horses, and so I am confident that they showed well, extremely well, and appropriately for their age group. And it wasn't enough.

Good sportsmanship dictates that we don't gripe when we don't place, and Emily Miles shows no signs of whining. Instead, she suggests that maybe we need to pay more attention - go to Europe more often - so we understand better what is needed to win in international competition.

Please, Emily, no.

Instead, perhaps we all need to ask, on a worldwide scale: is this what we really want? Young horses pushed to the extremes? Dressage that - ever since Totilas - has come to look more and more like Saddleseat? Dressage has had training barns for some years now where Saddleseat techniques are used, including the abusive ones. Emily Miles coined the word "pumped-upness" to describe what her horses were lacking compared to the higher-placed youngsters. Can that really have become a required quality in any dressage horse who wants to win in international competition? From young FEI horses to grand prix competitors, the answer appears to be yes. Dr. Reiner Klimke would be rolling in his grave if he could see "pumped-upness" become an essential element for winning. 

Envision the perfect dressage horse: willing and submissive, moving with impulsion and suppleness and athleticism, responsive and in harmony with the rider. Beauty and balance. You can't "improve" that by adding flash, extreme movement, and "pumped-upness."

Dressage has been evolving from its beginnings in ancient Greece, where there were some pretty barbaric techniques along with the development of many of the more thoughtful training principles we use today. We've moved forward in training through the centuries as we've become more civilized; we've learned to create a living work of art, of beauty, because you can do that if you learn to work with a horse's natural way of going, using techniques that avoid force, so that you have harmony instead of tension. But it looks like that goal of dressage has been left in the dust, because it didn't have enough flash and pizazz. Instead, today's dressage is producing caricatures of a horse's natural way of going. 

I had a friend who was a Saddleseat rider who switched to dressage. She went back to Saddleseat after a while because she "missed the glitz." Come on back, Pam! We're totally getting there, and we're starting with our 5-, 6-, and 7-year-olds!

Tuesday, August 20, 2019

HorseMagazine: The Breeding De-Brief for Aachen and Ermelo

Christopher Hector, of The Horse Magazine, Australia, attended both the World Young Horse Championships and the CHIO at Aachen. As usual, his interest extends to the bloodlines behind what you're seeing at the shows.

"Those two great pillars of Dutch dressage breeding, Jazz and Ferro, are in the twilight of their breeding careers – a polite way of saying they are dead. But they still feature when the wonderful roster of competition horses at this year’s Aachen CHIO is distilled down to the top fifteen...."

And scroll down the page to read about the bloodlines at the World Young Horse Championships. "The first thing you notice is that young horse breeding has become very much the territory of stallions who were themselves, young horse competitors. ..."

And, as always, Chris provides some wonderful photos to illustrate the horses and bloodlines he's talking about. 

Read the full article here: Aachen and Ermelo - The Breeding De-Brief

Sunday, August 18, 2019

Carl Hester's Ride: "Best-Bred" U-Genius

Breeders in England face many of the same issues as North American breeders: it's a struggle to get recognized, when competitors assume horses bred on the continent are automatically better. That's starting to change, as the British do very well in competition on British-bred horses.

Horse & Hound magazine recently ran a story featuring U-Genius, with the headline "Meet the stallion Carl Hester deems the best-bred horse in the world." U-Genius was bred by Carl and Claire Hester, so he should know! And it's hard to argue with this: Sire: Carl's own Olympic ride Uthopia; Dam: Weidyfleur II - full sister to the incredible Valegro.

The full article is for subscribers only, but click here to read the intro and see a pic of U-Genius.

Friday, August 16, 2019

Leatherdale Farm's Fleur de Lis L Wins Three Medals at FEI NA Youth Championships

Warmblood Stallions of North America wishes to congratulate Leatherdale Farms for the success of their home-bred mare Fleur de Lis in the 2019 Youth Championships!

Photo: Meg McGuire Photography

North Salem, N.Y. - Aug. 16, 2019 - Leatherdale Farm's Fleur de Lis L (First Dance-EM De La Rosa, De Niro) and 19-year-old Canadian rider Vanessa Creech-Terauds are celebrating three podium finishes from their performances at the 2019 Adequan®/FEI North American Youth Championships that took place July 30-Aug. 4 in North Salem, New York. As Creech-Terauds and the 10-year-old Hanoverian's second appearance in the NAYC arena together, they rode with confidence to impress judges during each day of competition, earning them top-three finishes in every test.

"Every year it's a whole new ball game and a new challenge, but this championship is the best week of the year so I always look forward to it and push myself," shared Creech-Terauds. "I'm very competitive, so that helps me stay motivated, and this year I really wanted to do well with Fleur in the Young Rider division because we had done so well in Juniors [earning the individual and freestyle silver medals at NAYC 2016]. I'm happy to say she exceeded my expectations. I'm so proud of this mare, that really keeps me going and I love her so much."

The young rider picked up the ride on Fleur de Lis L in 2016 after the mare was started by Mike Suchanek, the young horse trainer at Leatherdale Farms' base in Minnesota. With Suchanek in the irons, she won the Second Level Open Championship at the 2015 U.S. Dressage Finals as well as the Training Level Open Reserve Championship at the 2014 Finals.

In 2016, Creech-Terauds and Fleur de Lis L, who is sired by Leatherdale Farm's Hanoverian stallion, First Dance, were a part of the NAYC Junior Riders division where they took home individual silver medals for both their Junior Individual test and their Junior Freestyle. The following year, they took a break from competing at NAYC when they traveled to Europe to train and compete in Denmark, Germany and England.

When they returned to the NAYC stage this summer, the pair competed in the Young Riders division, representing Team Ontario/Quebec in team competition. Creech-Terauds and her teammates put forth their best efforts against a competitive field of talented teams. Fleur de Lis L received a new personal best score of 72.5 percent during the team test, helping boost their team's total score to 205.676. The team concluded with the silver medal for their efforts, only missing gold by .03 of a point.

Photo: Meg McGuire Photography
"It's amazing to me to come here and win the team silver medal in the Young Rider division," said Creech-Terauds. "We've made so much progress together. I can't thank her owner, Louise Leatherdale, enough for partnering me with this talented mare. It's been the best experience of my life. She's my favorite horse in the whole world."

Maintaining their momentum, Creech-Terauds and the chestnut mare earned themselves another podium finish with an individual silver medial after receiving a 71.029 percent in the Young Rider Individual Test.

Topping off their successful week of top competition, Creech-Terauds and Fleur de Lis L claimed one last medal in the Young Rider Freestyle. A score of 73.49 percent secured the pair the bronze medal, only missing silver by .01 percent.

"Fleur gave it her all every single day and we laid out three tests that I am extremely proud of. It is always an honor to come to this event and represent our country, and bringing home three medals is truly a dream come true! Thank you, Fleur," expressed Creech-Terauds. "I truly am the luckiest girl in the world to be able to ride Louise Leatherdale's most amazing mare."

First Dance, sire of Fleur de Lis
To learn more about Fleur de Lis' sire, First Dance, click here.

To learn more about Leatherdale Farms, click here.

What We've Learned About Y Chromosomes - the Stallion Side

Are you interested in the historical breeding of horses? Very detailed new knowledge has come to light with recent DNA studies. HorseTalk.co.nz reports on one study tracing the Y chromosome - the one carried by stallions - and learned some interesting facts.

Click to read the report.

Tuesday, August 13, 2019

Foal Immunity - Info Available on theHorse.com

Do you have questions or concerns about foal immunity? theHorse.com is such a great resource for knowledge about all aspects of stallion, mare, and foal care. They have several articles on immunity in foals, and gathered 10 of them into a helpful list.

Click here to read "10 IgG Resources on theHorse.com".

In addition, a more recent article on theHorse.com is also of interest: Read Why Is Passive Transfer Important?

Saturday, August 10, 2019

Foal Hoof Balance

theHorse.com posted a report on a study by Dutch researchers about foal hoof balance. The study tracked foals for six months, and they found that the hoof balance changes quite quickly during that time.

To read the full report, click here.

Friday, August 9, 2019

Foundation Sire: Consul

Here is the next installment of Warmblood Stallions of North America’s Foundation Friday.  Every other Friday we will be featuring a foundation sire - one who has been influential in the development of warmblood breeds. We pull from the incredible archive of The Horse Magazine, published by Chris Hector of Australia. Thank you, Chris, for permission to draw on your expertise!
1960–1968
165 cm
Bay
Breeder: O. Weber


Consul is described by that most knowledgeable of breeding commentators, Claus Schridde, as “noble, bay, and the best stallion son of Cottage Son....”
Consul’s most successful foal was Granat, a dressage star with Christine Stückelberger (World Champion in 1978, and individual gold medalist at the Alternative Olympics in 1980). ...
Consul was the sire of 40 registered broodmares and is the dam sire of the stallions Caracas, Convent, Fernando, Logan and Roberto. The Consul daughter Deka is one of the great mares of German breeding....


To read the entire article, with pedigree, details of Consul's sons and daughters, on the Horse Magazine website, click here.

There are several stallion descendants of Consul in North America. Click on the following links to read about each of the ones on WarmbloodStallionsNA.com:

E.H. Herzensdieb

Vegas

Thursday, August 8, 2019

Dressage at Devon Announces Judges for 2019


August 1, 2019 (Devon, PA) – Dianne Boyd, Dressage at Devon Show Manager, announces the line-up for judges at the 2019 show.

Breed Division

Jayne Ayers (DSHB-R-WI)
Jayne Ayers has been an FEI “I” dressage judge for more than 10 years, and has been judging dressage for the US Equestrian Federation for almost 30 years. She has been a long-time member of the Dressage Committee, where she has served on sub-committees for Freestyle, Juniors, Young Horses, Rules, Test Writing, and Sport Horse Breeding. She is also licensed to judge Sport Horse Breeding shows. She was also an eventing judge for about 15 years, but ran out of time to do everything As a judge and clinician, she has represented the FEI on the World Dressage Challenge Tour and teaching FEI Development Clinics. In addition to a busy judging schedule in the United States and Canada, she has judged extensively in Central and South America, as well as in Europe. Jayne enjoys helping others develop their judging skills for dressage and for sport horse breeding. She has been a member of the USDF L Program Faculty since its inception. She instructs judge candidates and examines them at all levels for USEF. She also teaches riders at all levels at her training stable, as well as in clinics throughout the USA, Canada, and other countries. Horses she has trained and shown have won numerous national awards. She has been long and short-listed for the US Equestrian Team. She owns a training stable in Wisconsin, with her husband and two children, and has been breeding horses for dressage for over 20 years. 

Carter Bass (DSHB-R-VA)
Carter Bass has been involved with horses since childhood, competing in Hunters, Eventing and Dressage. She has been a dressage instructor for 35 years, and has coached several horse/rider combinations that have received Horse of the Year awards, regional championships and competed at Grand Prix. Bass has been a licensed official with the USEF since 1989, receiving “R” Dressage and “R” Dressage Sporthorse Breeding licenses. She was accepted into the USEF Senior Judges training program in 2012. She is a Bronze, Silver and Gold medalist.
           
Sue Mandas (DSHB-R-OH)
Sue has been involved in the sport of Dressage as competitor, trainer, breeder and instructor for over 40 years. She is a USEF “S” dressage judge, an “R” Sport Horse Breed judge, and an FEI 3* Para-Equestrian Judge. Involved with breeding warm blood Sport horses for many years, her first Grand Prix horse was one she bred, raised and trained herself. Sue is a USDF Bronze, Silver and Gold Medalist and earned the Silver and Gold Freestyle Bars. Sue has trained many horses to the FEI level, winning Regional Champion or Reserve Champion at every level, Second through Grand Prix, and making the USET longlist several times. Currently she is living in Centerville, Ohio where she rides, trains and teaches.

Kristi Wysocki (DSHB-R-CO)
Kristi Wysocki earned a degree in Metallurgical Engineering from Colorado School of Mines and worked as an engineer for fifteen years prior to returning her focus to her riding and training of dressage horses.  She is a USEF licensed "S" Dressage Judge, "R" Dressage Sport Horse Judge and an FEI 4* PARA Dressage Judge. She is a USDF Gold, silver and Bronze Medalist. She has competed several horses to the FEI levels, winning many regional and local championships through Grand Prix. She has also successfully competed in the CDI arena with multiple horses. Currently, she lives on Whidby Island, Washinton.

Her students have also competed successfully through the Grand Prix Level. Several students also have their bronze, silver, and/or gold medals. She has judged many USDF Regional Championships and Breeder Series Finals including Dressage at Devon, NEDA, CDS – Region 7 Lamplight – Region 3 and the new Global Dressage in Florida. She serves as the USDF Sport Horse Committee chair, is a member of the USDF Sport Horse Seminal Faculty, the USEF Dressage Committee, the USEF PARA Equestrian FEI PARA Equestrian FEI and National Affiliates Committee, and the 2012 United States PARA Dressage Selection Committee.

Performance Division

Jayne Ayers 3* 
Jayne Ayers has been an FEI “I” dressage judge for more than 10 years, and has been judging dressage for the US Equestrian Federation for almost 30 years. She has been a long-time member of the Dressage Committee, where she has served on sub-committees for Freestyle, Juniors, Young Horses, Rules, Test Writing, and Sport Horse Breeding. She is also licensed to judge Sport Horse Breeding shows. She was also an eventing judge for about 15 years, but ran out of time to do everything As a judge and clinician, she has represented the FEI on the World Dressage Challenge Tour and teaching FEI Development Clinics. In addition to a busy judging schedule in the United States and Canada, she has judged extensively in Central and South America, as well as in Europe. Jayne enjoys helping others develop their judging skills for dressage and for sport horse breeding. She has been a member of the USDF L Program Faculty since its inception. She instructs judge candidates and examines them at all levels for USEF. She also teaches riders at all levels at her training stable, as well as in clinics throughout the USA, Canada, and other countries. Horses she has trained and shown have won numerous national awards. She has been long and short-listed for the US Equestrian Team. She owns a training stable in Wisconsin, with her husband and two children, and has been breeding horses for dressage for over 20 years. 

Stephen Clarke 5*
Stephen Clarke is the FEI Official International Judge General and was head of the FEI Dressage judges’ panel at the Alltech/FEI World Equestrian Games and the 2012 London Olympics. He has worked around the globe at all major dressage competitions, including 4 World Cup Finals, 3 European Championships, the World Games in Jerez, the World Equestrian Games in Aachen, the Olympic Games in Athens, the World Young Horse Championships, the Junior/YR European Championships and the Pan American Games. As a rider, Stephen competed successfully both nationally and internationally on his own horses Ulysses, Becket, Warlock’s Water, Enchante and Eternal Spirit. He was reserve rider for the 1988 Seoul Olympics with Becket. Stephen is a well-spoken, well-respected clinician worldwide, capable of solving issues with practical effective exercises.

Carlos Lopes 4*
The 51-year old Lopes is a 4* international dressage judge and 5* Para dressage judge. Lopes also serves as captain of the Portuguese Grand Prix dressage team. He is an FEI Young Horse Judge, works regularly as an FEI Technical Delegate and is involved with CDI show organization in Portugal.

Jeanne McDonald 4* 
Jeanne began riding at age eight with the New Canaan Mounted Troop in Connecticut, and has earned her USDF Bronze, Silver and Gold Medals. With her 3rd GP horse, the Oldenburg Stallion Tantris, and his offspring that she has bred at her Turning Point Farm in Downingtown, PA, Jeanne is still competing to help keep her rider perspective! Jeanne has been a licensed USEF Dressage judge for over 28 years and along with her FEI 4* & YH Dressage Judge’s status, also holds a USEF “S” and a retired USEF/USDF “r” DSHB Judges license.  In addition to judging throughout South, Central & North America, including National Dressage Championships, she has also judged the European Jr & Yr Championships in Holland.  When not judging or riding, she enjoys teaching clinics from the West to East Coast which keeps her busy most every weekend from February thru November.

Cesar Torrente 4* (USDF-S COL)
A native of Colombia, Cesar Torrente is an international dressage judge and an FEI level dressage competitor. He is the first judge to be promoted through the new FEI 3 * program. Cesar has had the honor of standing on medal podium to receive the team gold medal two times in the Central American Games. He is a corporate lawyer by profession.

Despite traveling the globe to judge worldwide, he maintains the precarious balance between his career and his passion for horses with apparent ease. He is known in the dressage world as a €œrider ™s judgeâ, because he knows what it is like to be in the judges box, as well as the sandbox we call the dressage ring. Best of all, Cesar exudes warmth and is most often found with a smile on his face.

Lee Tubman (CDN)
With 30 years experience as a judge, Tubman is based in Wellington, Florida and travels across Canada, USA and South America for dressage clinics and judging assignments as a FEI 4*, Equine Canada “S”, and USEF “S” Judge. A few of Tubman’s accolades as a competitor include receiving a USDF gold medal, FEI 5 and6 Year old Champion, gold and bronze NAYRC medalist, Canadian National Grand Prix Champion and a member of Team Canada at the 2012 and 2013 Wellington Nations Cup CDIO 4*.


Tubman has received the 3M Corporation Canadian Coach of the Year and has coached six Young Riders to NAYRC – two Team Bronze medals, four top 10 placings, and two students have become professional trainers. Additionally, Tubman has produced a large number of Small Tour and Young Rider horses as well as successful Grand Prix mounts. 


Cristof Umbach 5*
Christof, 53, of Luxembourg is the first 5* from that nation. He was appointed 3* in 2008, 4* in 2011 and 4* for young horses a year later. He is a principal of the Grand Ducal dressage center team along with Grand Prix rider Sascha Schulz and French sponsor Patrice Mourruau. The team organizes the CDI at Leudelange.

Kristi Wysocki (R-CO)
Kristi Wysocki earned a degree in Metallurgical Engineering from Colorado School of Mines and worked as an engineer for fifteen years prior to returning her focus to her riding and training of dressage horses.  She is a USEF licensed "S" Dressage Judge, "R" Dressage Sport Horse Judge and an FEI 4* PARA Dressage Judge. She is a USDF Gold, silver and Bronze Medalist. She has competed several horses to the FEI levels, winning many regional and local championships through Grand Prix. She has also successfully competed in the CDI arena with multiple horses. Currently, she lives on Whidby Island, Washington.

Her students have also competed successfully through the Grand Prix Level. Several students also have their bronze, silver, and/or gold medals. She has judged many USDF Regional Championships and Breeder Series Finals including Dressage at Devon, NEDA, CDS – Region 7 Lamplight – Region 3 and the new Global Dressage in Florida. She serves as the USDF Sport Horse Committee chair, is a member of the USDF Sport Horse Seminal Faculty, the USEF Dressage Committee, the USEF PARA Equestrian FEI PARA Equestrian FEI and National Affiliates Committee, and the 2012 United States PARA Dressage Selection Committee.


About Dressage at Devon
Dressage at Devon (www.dressageatdevon.org has been a premier North American Equestrian event since its founding in 1975.  It combines world-class dressage competition and the world’s largest open breed show with the international Fall Festival show and special activities for the entire family.  The six-day event attracts hundreds of riders from around the world and thousands of spectators.  Dressage at Devon is a 501(c) (3) PA non-profit organization, benefitting equine education.


Tuesday, August 6, 2019

Contest To Win Dressage at Devon Tickets

Would you like to attend the largest open breed show in the world? Plus three days of upper-level dressage? Warmblood Stallions of North America has just announced a chance for you to win a pair of tickets for all six days of Dressage at Devon 2019!

Dressage at Devon will be held this year from September 24th through September 29th. Dressage at Devon is famous not only for drawing some of the finest competitors in North American dressage, but also for presenting the largest open breed show in the world. The breed show is held the first three days: Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday; with the performance division running Friday through Sunday. Warmblood Stallions of North America is proud to partner with Dressage at Devon to offer this opportunity to win tickets to all six days of the show.

Enter the drawing now! Contest closes Wednesday, August 21. Contest extended through Friday, August 23!

Click here to enter.

Saturday, August 3, 2019

World Young Horse Championships Reports

Chris Hector, of The Horse Magazine, has been at the World Young Horse Championships in Ermelo, The Netherlands, and has published his first report. It's not flattering. He believes the judges are rewarding horses who have been pushed too hard and too far for their ages, and I think he has a compelling case for his opinion, sadly.

Read Chris's report on Day One here.

More Reports:

Dressage-News.com: d'Avie Wins World Young Horse Championship for Seven-Year-Olds Ridden by Spain's Severo Jurado Lopez for Second Straight Title

Dressage-News.com: Zucchero, Oldenburg Stallion Ridden by Germany's Frederic Wandres to World Young Horse Six-Year-Old Gold, Andreas Helgstrand Horses Silver, Bronze

HorseMagazine.com: Satisfaction in the Six Year Olds

Dressage-News.com: World Young Horse 5-Year-Old Championship Won by Jovian Ridden by Andreas Helgstrand, also Takes Bronze o Queenparks Wendy

HorseMagazine.com: Great Win for Andreas Helgstrand

For an overview of the three champions on EverythingHorse.com, click here.

Dressage-News.com: 6-Year-Old Preliminary test

Dressage-News.com: 5-Year-Old Preliminary test

HorseMagazine.com: Chris Hector's report on the bloodlines represented at both the Aachen CHIO and the World Young Horse Championships: The Breeding De-Brief

Report from US competitor Emily Miles, on Dressage-News.com: Emily Miles on World & US Young Horse Championships

Thursday, August 1, 2019

Better Results with Cooled Semen

As a new article on theHorse.com points out, breeding with cooled shipped semen is one of the most common methods on insemination. Results with cooled semen are often more dependable than with frozen, but, according to the article, "studies have shown that this technique can result in lower pregnancy and foaling rates than live cover or AI with fresh semen." 


In the article, Katila Terttu, DVM, MS, PhD discusses factors that affect fertility when using cooled semen, and how to get better results.

Wednesday, July 31, 2019

Healthy Broodmares Can Shed EHV-1


Research by Carina Cooper, DVM indicates that barn mates and foals could be at risk for equine herpesvirus-1 shed vaginally from healthy broodmares. She urges strong measures to prevent disease spread, and believes further research should be done on sources of infection.


To read more on theHorse.com, click here.

Tuesday, July 30, 2019

What Choices Most Improved Your Breeding Program?

by Anna Goebel, inspired by a discussion on Facebook.

"When looking back over your breeding career, which choices did you make that most improved your breeding program?"

That is the question recently posted on Facebook by breeder Kendra Hansis. Thoughtful answers were posted in response. There were things that surprised me, and there was a lot of agreement on several of the answers. I thought it might be useful to curate the responses and post them here.


1. The first response was posted by Marne Martin-Tucker, and was echoed by several others: "Buy great young mares." She usually buys foals, as does Kimberly Davies, who says, "I’d never be able to afford the horses I have now for breeding or sport if I hadn’t bought them as foals." Jackie VandenBrink said she "bought an amazing broodmare when the opportunity presented itself. Never regretted it. Best investment." Holly Kovach told of selling half of her barn "to buy the foal that I wanted from the Elite auction. The bloodlines are incredible and we’re not available in the US at the time." Broodmares are the heart of the breeding business, and have a huge influence in each specific cross - so it makes sense to have the best broodmares you possibly can. 

2. Continue to improve your breeding stock. Every foaling season is a time of evaluation, and your program will improve every time you tweak things in a better direction. This includes "culling" mares - removing them from your breeding program if they're not producing what you want - and bringing in new mares that fit your goals. Says Kendra Hansis, "I continue to try to improve my mares because I believe they’re the most important part of the equation." Debra MacMillan describes her approach: "Purchasing top bloodline mares, retaining even better fillies from them and now doing my own breeding, hopefully using more stallions here in the US. I feel my mare herd is top and this allows for many choices."


3. Ride your horses. I hadn't thought of this as a critical piece for a breeder, but in some cases it can make a big difference. Eliza Rutherford responded that it was a very important choice for her. "No amount of staring at them on the ground compares to actually riding them and getting a feel for what they are like in the connection. It has absolutely made a huge difference in all breeding decisions." Theresa Schnell says that in "developing our horses, ... I have learned [that] rideability and temperament (absolutely 3 good gaits) trump huge crazy gaits and nutty horses." Jennifer Hoffman agrees. "For me, one of the biggest assets is having been able to ride many of my broodmares. This has allowed me to have much more insight past their character in the stable and seeing their gaits. I am able to feel how the contact, sensitivity, trainability, looseness of the back and many many more traits can weigh on my breeding choices. I choose stallions I have either sat on myself, or can or have seen ridden. This has been a large factor in my breeding choices and also how I can advise potential buyers on what the offspring may feel like." As Marne Martin-Tucker puts it, she has tried to buy great young mares and "competed them myself so that I knew better what they needed to either get to the big tour or get there faster." Kendra Hansis, however, relies more heavily on feedback from her mares' professional riders and her foals' buyers about her horses' rideability, because she is breeding for professional riders, and believes that her own opinion as a rider, in comparison, isn't as important as what pros want or need in a horse. The ultimate breeding goal is important to bear in mind. "Some breeders focus on producing for themselves or for the amateur rider," Hansis says, "but how or what I like to ride has little bearing on what my clients want in a horse. I get tons and tons of feedback from top amateurs and professionals," she says, which helps inform her breeding decisions. She advocates in general for more good conversations between breeders and riders.


4. Travel. Theresa Schnell takes yearly trips to Germany. "Seeing what nicks work and seeing stallions in person really helps in picking boys I might or might not have picked. That goes in both directions; they may look good in video and not in person." Dawn Spencer also lists a trip to Europe as her most important choice, to see examples of the bloodlines in person, and to evaluate European business practices. Kelly Gage says it's important for her as well, "spending time in Europe to see an entire generational effect of bloodlines."


5. Do your own repro work if you can. As Eowyn Brewer put it, "learning to do your own breeding work is huge in regards to being able to survive financially." Vet work is a big piece on the expense side of the ledger, and many breeders have learned to handle much of it themselves. Jane Bartram takes a different approach, and says one of her best choices was "having an equine vet as a husband"! Kendra Hansis says doing her own vet work "has saved me so much $$$." If you use a vet, Cheryl DeRoche Johnson advocates sticking with one to improve accountability. She travels to one repro specialist after some bad experiences with her local generalist.


6. "Listening to my gut," is important to Holly Kovach, "and not to the peanut gallery." This comment got several Likes and a lot of agreement. Kendra Hansis adds, "being a good breeder means trusting yourself."


Contributors:


Kendra Hansis posted the original question, above. She has had a phenomenal year as a breeder, which left her feeling "like floating on air, but also reflective," and thinking about how to keep improving. As someone who firmly believes in the power of community among breeders, she posted this question. Her farm is Runningwater Warmbloods, in New Jersey, where she breeds Oldenburg horses, with international quality as the goal.


Marne Martin-Tucker owns Aspen Leaf Farm in Maryland. The goal of Aspen Leaf is to breed foals of CDI-quality with friendly temperaments. Marne is also a USDF Bronze, Silver, and Gold medalist who has competed at Grand Prix in the US, Germany, and England.


Debra MacMillan breeds superior-quality warmbloods at her Ridgefield Farm in Maine. Her goal is to breed excellent athletes by choosing the finest sires for her top-bloodline mares.


Kimberly Davies focuses on breeding and developing high-quality warmblood sporthorses at her Ariston Farm LLC in New Jersey. They own the approved premium stallion Escamillo (Escolar x Rohdiamant x De Niro).


Cheryl DeRoche Johnson has been breeding since 2003 and is in the process of scaling back to retire.


Jennifer Hoffman has a small breeding program in Pennsylvania called Autumn Charm Sport Horses, where she breeds for the amateur rider in dressage, hunter, and eventing. She also stands the stallion Coromino. "At the end of the day the riders only really care about the feeling, connection and ability to expand and contract the gaits or produce a flawless jump. My end goal is always to produce horses who end up with great homes. This has to be due to a combination of character/ temperament/ athletic ability and soundness."


Kelly Gage of Lexington, Kentucky is a USDF Bronze and Silver Medalist and owns and operates Team EnGaged Dressage. She actively develops young horses towards the FEI, and maintains a very small breeding operation on the side that focuses on Dutch and German lines with the goal of high performance. Her first homebreds started foaling in 2019. 


Jackie VandenBrink operates VandenBrink Warmbloods in the Niagara Region of Ontario Canada. The breeding program targets mostly the hunter and dressage markets. Originally from the Netherlands, she has an appreciation for Gelders foundation lines as well as the modern Dutch dressage horse but will use whichever bloodlines help make a marketable product. Character and temperament are high on the list of priorities in addition to the goal to produce a horse with great conformation, superior gaits and athleticism.


Dawn Spencer breeds modern dressage horses in the Midwest, at Spencer Sport Horses. She has streamlined her mare herd to include only modern Dutch and German bloodlines and movement. She breeds to talented, relevant stallions, hoping to "ensure my foals are desirable and marketable in-utero or their first year."


Theresa Schnell owns Rock Solid Warmbloods LLC, a boutique breeder of top quality German Warmblood horses. "We strive to breed horses that Professionals want and love to ride and Amateurs can enjoy as well. We have done really really well in developing, testing (MPTs,SPTs) and showing our horses. I have great riders/trainers that have now ridden generations of my horses. We currently stand FEI stallion Rock Solid (Rosenthal x Parabola/Parabol/Efendi). In 2019 we will add: Rock Royale RSW (Rock Solid x SPS/El Alsonara/Archipel/Weltmeyer) and Jackson FF (Johnson x El/Lhoretta/Lörke).


Holly Kovach co-owns Iron Horse Farm, in Kentucky, with her husband David, and they breed mostly Hanoverians for the hunter jumper disciplines. Holly is on the Jumper Breeding committee of the American Hanoverian Society.  


Eowyn Brewer has been a breeder of Oldenburg, Hanoverian, and RPSI horses since 1997, striving to produce horses that are suitable for amateurs and juniors.


Jane Bartram is the owner of Hollands Bend Warmbloods and Elite Frozen Foals in Victoria, Australia.


Eliza Rutherford manages Foxwood Hanoverians in Vermont. She breeds Hanoverian foals by top German stallions out of high-quality mares, with an emphasis on temperament.



Thank you to all who took the time to post, and to respond to my emails! Breeders supporting breeders with good conversation and thoughtful comments is one of my favorite things!


Note that these are dressage breeders, because the original thread was posted in a dressage breeding group on Facebook. If you breed hunters or jumpers or eventers, would you agree? Are there other decisions you made that you feel made you a better breeder? Please post comments below.





Monday, July 29, 2019

Treatments for Uterine Tube Obstruction in Mares

Uterine tube obstruction in mares is not common, but it does happen. An article published this spring on theHorse.com reports on a talk given at the 2018 American Association of Equine Practitioners Convention.


Research from Stephanie Walbornn, DVM, Dipl. ACT reveals pregnancy rates after different treatment options for uterine tube obstruction. Her results provide an overview guide for owners deciding on the best procedure for their mare for safety and future fertility.



Meet Faro SQF's Breeder

Breeder-focused article on Chronicle of the Horse
As we reported in an article earlier this month, the 2019 Pan American Games US Teams include three horses bred in the US. There are two on the Eventing Team and one on the Dressage Team. Recently, the Chronicle of the Horse published an article about Faro SQF, an 11-year-old gelding on the US Dressage Team. The focus was on his breeder, Jill Peterson of Star Quarry Farm in Florida.

It is delightful, not only to see US-bred horses competing internationally, but to see them recognized in the news, and to see their breeders acknowledged. Congratulations to Jill Peterson!

Read the full Chronicle article here.

Saturday, July 27, 2019

Practical Ways To Reduce Weaning Stress


As we enter late summer and early fall, breeders' thoughts turn to weaning this year's foals. Research in the last few years has uncovered how the stress of weaning can put foals at risk, sometimes with long-term consequences. Responsible breeders are taking this information seriously and looking for ways to reduce the impact of weaning on foals.

From her studies of immune response, immunology researcher Amanda Adams, PhD discusses practical, informed ways to reduce weaning stress in this article on theHorse.com. She also shares the results of her investigations into ways to boost a horse’s immune systems.

Read the article here.

Photo credit: Hanna V [CC BY-SA 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)]