Friday, October 19, 2018

Foundation Sire: Capitol

Here is the next installment of Warmblood Stallions of North America’s Foundation Friday.  Every other Friday we will be featuring a foundation sire - one who has been influential in the development of warmblood breeds. We pull from the incredible archive of The Horse Magazine, published by Chris Hector of Australia. Thank you, Chris, for permission to draw on your expertise!


1975–1999
169 cm
Grey
Breeder: Harm Thörmalen

In The Holsteiner Horse, Capitol is described thus:
"Distinctive sire with plenty of stallion expression, yet lacking the final touch of charm. Large head, mighty neck with strong jowls. Top-line not ideal. Good legs with pronounced joints, but slight flaws in the transition of the joint. Relaxed, elastic gaits; enormous jumping ability.”
His first crop produced Corso, who, ridden by the Swiss Willi Melliger, won many Grand Prix and speed classes, and competed at the European championships in St. Gallen in 1987, the World Cup final in Gothenburg in 1988, the Nations Cup at Aachen and the European Championships in Rotterdam. Suddenly his offspring were in huge demand and setting record prices. Three of his important sons were then licensed for Holstein: Carthago (1987), Cassini I (1988) and Cento (1989). Indoctro was licensed in Holland in 1990 and spread the blood of Capitol to that country.
Following the success of his progeny, Capitol moved to 2nd on the WBFSH standings in 1999, and to first place in 2000 and 2001. At the Olympic Games in Sydney in 2000, he was represented by three horses: Carthago, Campione M and Cento. At the Athens Games, he was represented by four: Cardento, Casita, Cento and Goliath. As of 2007, his offspring had won over €5.3 million. There are 34 of his stallion sons world-wide and 25 in Holstein alone, and they have proven wonderful sires in their own right.

Capitol I’s full-brother, Capitol II was initially rejected by the licensing commission but was approved based on his performance as a showjumper, but he failed to follow his brother’s footsteps and left nothing of interest.
According to Harm Thormälen, whose family bred Capitol:
“The Capitol horses have scope – scope and easy to handle. Amateurs can ride the Capitol horses. Sometimes they are not ‘blood’ enough, they need blood. In his last years Capitol was only allowed to breed to mares with Thoroughbred blood. The mare sire had to be Thoroughbred, or otherwise Cor de la Bryère – so Capitol got very good mares. It was top management by the Holsteiner Verband, with very good results in the sport. The children of Capitol have won the most money in the sport of any stallion in the world.”
In the 2007-2008 Monneron leaderboard of the top 75 jumping stallions in the world, based on the FEI results of the top 2515 jumpers, Bernard le Courtois finds four major stallion lines: Almé, Cor de la Bryère, Landgraf and Capitol I. Capitol ranks 37th with 8 winners. His best performer is the mare Gitania – but five of his stallion sons feature in the top 75.
On the 2013 German FN list of the top 1% of jumping sires, Capitol is represented by three sons: Carthago (12th), Cardento (18th) and Cassini I (28th).

Examining the breeding at the WEG in Caen, what did come as a bit of a shock was the influence of the somewhat unfashionable Capitol. The most represented Capitol line stallion was his son Cardento with six, but then there was Indoctro with four (three of them ridden by less than professional riders), Cassini I provided three, then there are two by Cento, one each for Canadian River and Centauer, two by Capitol’s grandson, Cumano, one by another grand-son, Colman and one by Capitol himself.
Capitol I grandson Imothep, at the WEG in Normandy, with Darragh Kenny riding. Click here to read Imothep's Stallion Profile on WarmbloodStallionsNA.com. See below for more stallion descendants in North America.


To read the entire article, with pedigree and more offspring details, on the Horse Magazine website, click here.
There are several stallion descendants of Capitol I in North America. Click on the following links to read about each of the ones on WarmbloodStallionsNA.com:



Tuesday, October 9, 2018

Bloodlines at the WEG: Analysis From The Horse Magazine


Those who have read Chris Hector's analyses of past international events from a breeding perspective will want to head over to The Horse Magazine for the latest installment. Chris, along with Gemma Alexander of Pacific Jumping Breeding, have recently posted their analysis of the bloodlines at the WEG. 

Chris and Gemma take a look at the bloodlines of the most successful horses in Jumping, Dressage, and Eventing. They look at the most successful sires of the top horses in all three disciplines, and analyze each cross. They also look at the studbooks that had the most successful horses. 

Click here to read the full article.

Friday, October 5, 2018

Foundation Sire: Rohdiamant

Here is the next installment of Warmblood Stallions of North America’s Foundation Friday.  Every other Friday we will be featuring a foundation sire - one who has been influential in the development of warmblood breeds. We pull from the incredible archive of The Horse Magazine, published by Chris Hector of Australia. Thank you, Chris, for permission to draw on your expertise!



It was Rohdiamant, a foal from his first crop (out of Elektia V who is by the Anglo Arab stallion Inschallah), who put Rubinstein on the map as a sire. In 1993, Martina Hannöver rode Rohdiamant into equal first place (with Wolkenstein II) in the 3-year-old Championship at the Bundeschampionate.

Rohdiamant went on to be an exciting Grand Prix horse, ridden by the then-German-based, US-born Lisa Wilcox, and just missed out on the American dressage team to go to the Sydney Olympic Games. He then disappeared from the competition circuit after a series of disappointing outings.

For a while he looked as if he might be an exciting sire: Ronaldo won the 4-year-old Mares and Geldings Championship at the Bundeschampionate in 1998 and went on to be reserve champion in the five-year-old dressage championship in 2000, while another son, Roman Nature, won the 3-year-old Stallion title at the 1998 Bundeschampionate, and the 5-year-old stallion class at the big stallion show at Zwolle, but just as Roman Nature failed to go on, Rohdiamant’s career also stalled – perhaps because his offspring tended to vary so wildly in type, from black and 17 hands to orange and 14.2….

The 2014 Hanoverian Stallion book records that Rohdiamant has 693 registered competition horses with €937,247 in prize money. There are 616 place-getters in dressage (109 to S level) and 70 jumpers.

He produced 15 horses with winnings of more than €10,000. Top of the list is Helen Langhanenberg’s Responsible, a horse that almost made it to the top, but still won €81,521. Currently the Italian rider Valentina Truppa has been very successful with Eremo del Castegno (out of a Weltmeyer mare), while his son, Blue Hors Romanov, has had a moderately successful career at Grand Prix level.

In the 2016 Hanoverian book, he has 699 competition horses for €1,015,835 in winnings. Nineteen dressage horses have earned over €10,000. His FN dressage value is 139, for jumping, 73. His Hanoverian dressage value is 142 (trot – 107, canter – 127, walk – 174, rideability – 145) with a jumping value of 87. He scores 117 for type, and 120 for his limbs.
In the 2017 book, he has 704 competitors with earnings of €1,047,014. Nineteen progeny have won €10,000, with Responsible still the most successful.

On the 2017 FN breeding values, he scores 133 as a young horse sire, and 140 for open competition. On the Hanoverian values he scores 141 for dressage, and 86 for jumping. His value for type is 115.

In the 2018 Hanoverian Stallion book, Rohdiamant has 711 competitors, with winnings of €1,077,658. He sired 124 S level dressage competitors and 22 dressage horses that won more than €10,000, the most successful of which was Responsible OLD with €81,521. He was the sire of 11 licensed sons, the most important of which were the full-brothers Romanov and Rubin-Royal. His FN dressage value for 2017 as a sire of young horse competitors was 132, while his value for open competitors is 139. Interestingly, when I looked at the German FN breeding values from 2002 to 2017, only seven appeared on both lists: Don Schufro, Fidermark, Welt Hit I & II, Donnerhall, Florestan and Rohdiamant.


To read the entire article, with pedigree and more offspring details, on the Horse Magazine website, click here.
There are several stallion descendants of Rohdiamant in North America. Click on the following links to read about each of the ones on WarmbloodStallionsNA.com:




Tuesday, October 2, 2018

Dressage at Devon Breed Show Wrap-Up

Devon, PA – Day 3 at Dressage at Devon (www.dressageatdevon.org) had something for everyone. Breed and performance competitors were at their best, under mostly clear skies.

 
The Breed Show Concludes
 
Thursday started off with sunshine and the breed show. All the horses were special but two stood out.
 
Summersby II (Sezuan), bred by Nicole Wanning and owned by Grand Prix rider Alice Tarjan. This striking mare is a 17.3, 3-year-old Oldenburg. She won the Filly Championship, took home the blue in the 3-year-old Dressage at Devon Prospect Champion, won the Dressage at Devon Grand Championship and the USDF DSHB Mare Final with a score of 80.925. She was in the winner’s circle again, placing first in the USDFBC Three-Year-Old Materiale Championship with a score of 91.25. Tarjan is known for ability to spot a new prospect and bring it along to top levels – in her spare time. She is a lawyer who works with her husband in their trucking and rigging business as well as in real estate.
 
Dhanube (Destano/Special Premium Lhorna Doone by Londonderry) is owned and bred by Maureen Swanson, a breeder from Slatington, Pennsylvania, was another star. This 16.2, chestnut mare was Dressage at Devon Reserve Champion Mature Horse, overall high score Born in the USA (84.350%), winner of 4-year-old and older Maiden Mares, 4 year old and older mares under saddle, GOV class, and Mare Champion. She is 5th generation from Swanson’s breeding program and descends from her first Hanoverian riding mare.
 
More Highlights
 
The USDF DSHB Stallion Final was won by Lionel, a 17.1 bay Danish gelding, owned by Cara Kettenbach and bred by Oak Hill Ranch (North Andover, MA).
 
The USDFBC Current Year Foal Final was won by Noah ISF (Contango/Cayenne w), a 12.3 bay colt bred by Iron Spring Farm.
 
The USDFBC Filly Final was won by Savannah HTF (Sternlicht ggf/Allegra q) with a score of 78.438. This two-year-old Hanoverian was bred by Hilltop Farm (Colera, MD).

Thursday, September 27, 2018

Find Your Next Champion at the Dressage at Devon Breed Show

September 18, 2018 (Devon, PA) – Dressage at Devon (DAD) (www.dressageatdevon.org) hosts the largest open breed show in the world, with top breeders bringing their colts, fillies, stallions and mares to compete.

“This year’s scheduling changes to the breed show will not only benefit our competitors, it will allow equestrians in all disciplines, as well as performance competitors, to view future champions in the Dixon Oval,” said Melanie Sloyer, Chair of the Breed Division at Dressage at Devon.

“The breeders at Dressage at Devon have been breeding top quality horses for years, if not decades,” added Sloyer. “Many go on to top dressage levels. But many others find their niche in hunters, jumpers and all other equestrian disciplines.”

And the best of the best will compete on Thursday. Championship classes include:

Grand Championship - Champion and Reserve from classes 212 & 218

USDF Current Year Foal Final

USDF Filly Final USDF Colt/Geldings Final

USDF Mare Final

USDF Stallion Final

USDFBC Three-year-old Materiale Championship

USDFBC 4-5 year old Materiale Championship

 Don’t forget to take a break to walk in the Fall Festival, featuring great food and shopping that appeals to the whole family - equestrians and non-equestrians alike. From jewelry to art, clothing to saddles, there are boutique-style shops that appeal to everyone!

Wednesday, September 26, 2018

Dressage at Devon Breed Show: Day 1

Foal Champion Branley Ash Nautilus

Devon, PA – The largest open breed show in the world is taking place at Dressage at Devon from September 25 – September 27. 

More than 20 breeds of horses and ponies of all shapes and sizes were in the ring Tuesday competing for the best of their breed. They were judged on movement, conformation and general impression.

Many of the breeds were rare, even endangered, and all have a rich history. For instance, said Adrienne Morella, whose horse took home the blue in the Shagya Arabian class, "The Shagya Arabian is a relatively rare breed, and brings the history of a Desert Arabian; great hardiness and toughness, endurance, ease of keeping and inborn friendliness and combines it with the requirements of the modern riding horse.”

For the first time, Dressage at Devon, also held classes just for ponies, who are classified into breeds just as their larger peers. “We were very pleased with the response to our new pony classes. Ponies were always allowed in the breed classes but this provided a new opportunity for pony breeders and owners,” said Melanie Sloyer, Chair of the Breed Division.

Classes included Pony Fillies of the current year, Pony Colts/Geldings of the current year, in addition to yearlings, two-year-olds, plus four-year-old classes. The Pony Foal Championship was won by Branley Ash Nautilus (by the German Riding Pony stallion FS Numero Uno out of Georgina/Dornik B), a Weser-Ems a foal of the current year, owned by Samantha Kidd of Carthage, NC, and bred by Christine Baker.

“The pony classes were fun addition to the show,” said Natalie DiBeradinis, General Manager and Breeding Manager for Hilltop Farm, Inc. (Colera, MD). “It was nice to have pony classes because it’s harder for the ponies to compete against the horses. We brought ponies that we wouldn’t normally bring. And we’re happy that they did so well.” #ponypower

The Dressage at Devon Breed Show continues through September 27.

Friday, September 21, 2018

Foundation Sire: Farn

Here is the next installment of Warmblood Stallions of North America’s Foundation Friday.  Every other Friday we will be featuring a foundation sire - one who has been influential in the development of warmblood breeds. We pull from the incredible archive of The Horse Magazine, published by Chris Hector of Australia. Thank you, Chris, for permission to draw on your expertise!

1959 – 1984
169 cm
Brown
Breeder: M. Thormählen


Farn was born in Holstein and descends from the Achill or "F" line that began in 1877. Next to the Ethelbert line, it is the oldest Holsteiner stallion line. Farn himself left only a few offspring in Holstein, and his description in the official Holstein stallion book is less than glowing: "Somewhat unharmonious stallion with a lovely head carriage. Built slightly ‘downhill’, good shoulder, flat back, heavily padded loin. Heavy bone, weak pasterns. Good mover."

However, he impressed the visitors from Holland, the NWP committee members who purchased him, hoping his daughters would upgrade Dutch breeding – and he eventually became one of the great stallions of the Dutch Warmbloods.

At the time Farn was brought to Holland, the old agricultural horse was being transformed into the modern sporting model, but the farmers were still wary of the lighter types of Trakehner and Thoroughbred horses that were to play such a vital role – Farn with his Holsteiner heritage and substance was more their sort of horse. However, the lighter stallions gained popularity and the breeders in the north lost interest in Farn. Jacob Melissen takes up the story in his1994/95 edition of The Leading Stallions of the Netherlands:

“In the South however, the heavy stallion was received enthusiastically. Southern breeders had been almost overshooting their mark, when trying to generate a fine riding-horse with intensive use of Thoroughbred blood, which had resulted in loss of size, and funny necks. They wanted to restore volume and bone. Farn broke the service records. In 1979 he was offered 236 mares. In 1978 he had been awarded the ‘keur’ predicate; in 1991, he was declared ‘preferent’, seven years after his death. He left eleven approved sons, 123 ‘ster’, 31 ‘keur’, 14 ‘preferent’ and 6 ‘prestatie’ mares.”

Farn was the sire of several notable international showjumpers, including Odin N, Black and White, Design and Olympus. Aside from Nimmerdor, Farn sired a number of stallion sons, including: Fanfare, Felix, Garant (ex Flipper), Safari, Telstar and Uddel. By the end of his breeding career, Farn was the sire of 13 approved sons.


To read the entire article, with pedigree and more offspring details, on the Horse Magazine website, click here.
There are several stallion descendants of Farn in North America. Click on the following links to read about each of the ones on WarmbloodStallionsNA.com: