Monday, November 18, 2019

Jaguar van Paemel Earns Multiple Breeding Approvals

Jaguar van Paemel.
Photo: www.fotoroyal.be

Jaguar van Paemel, a 2009 Belgian Warmblood stallion imported to the US in 2019, was recently Approved for breeding by multiple US and European registries, following his November presentation at the multi-registry licensing at Pollyrich Farm in California. Jaguar was Approved by Zangersheide as a young stallion, and went on to an international show jumping career. Based on his competition record and his presentation results, he is now also Approved for the American Hanoverian Society and Hanoverian Verband, American Rhineland Studbook, Belgian Warmblood Association and BWP/NAD, Westfalen Verband and North American Westfalen Studbook.

Photo: www.fotoroyal.be
Jaguar was bred by Luc van Eeckhoudt and Karin Verdeyen of Stoeterij van Paemel in Belgium, who owned him until this year. He competed up to 1 meter 60 in international competition, mostly under Dirk Demeersman. In 2018 and into 2019 he competed with French rider Aldrick Cheronnet.

Jaguar van Paemel: Scope to spare.
Jaguar is a 17.2-hand stallion by Cicero Z van Paemel out of Sissi by Sandro. He has an impressive jumping style and scope. Hap Hansen, who saw Jaguar in Europe and again this year in the US, says, "Jaguar van Paemel has phenomenal technique. He has a beautiful style, with scope to spare." Jaguar seems to pass on the scope over fences, as well as great temperament and work ethic.

Jaguar has about 75 offspring in Europe and a handful in the US. His first foals turned 6 this year, and are beginning their showing and breeding careers. Nic Nac van Paemel (2013) and several others jumped at the 1m30 level in Europe this summer. Other notable standouts are: Jewel ASK, a 2016 son out of a Diamant de Semilly mare who is licensed for Danish Warmblood breeding; Jukebox van Paemel (2014); and Jetset van Paemel Z (2015).

Jewel ASK, Approved Danish Warmblood son of Jaguar.
Jukebox van Paemel at 3.
Photo: www.fotoroyal.be

Jetset van Paemel, by Jaguar.

Photo: www.fotoroyal.be
Jaguar van Paemel is owned by Geraldine Bidwell of Santa Barbara, California; collections will be handled by Santa Lucia Farm.


For more information, please visit Jaguar's Stallion Profile page, or stop by his website, www.Jaguar.horse to see videos and photos of Jaguar and his offspring.

Contact Geri at geraldine@bidwell.com.

Thursday, November 7, 2019

Sport Stallion Approval Process Explained

by Crystal Toogood of Eurequine

Escher DFEN, a 2015 Hanoverian stallion, passed his 2019 NA Stallion Sport Test in the Jumping category. He is owned by Sarah McCarthy and stands at Eurequine. Photo by Sarah McCarthy

Crystal Toogood, of Eurequine, LLC, attended the North American Stallion Sport Test (West Coast), and wrote this piece to help people understand better the process of stallion testing and approval. Reprinted here with permission.

How a stallion becomes approved for breeding can be complicated to understand at first. If you are not familiar with the process, we hope you find our following overview of information helpful in understanding the basics of what is required of our breeding stallions and part of what makes the registered sport horses so special.
Stallion sport testing is a requirement for stallions of most warmblood breed societies to obtain lifetime breeding approval. Stallion licensing (which is different than stallion testing and not covered here) is a prerequisite to attending the Stallion Sport Test. In unique circumstances stallions may obtain lifetime breeding approval thru their success in performance, such as our stallion Rubignon through an international Grand Prix career or Relevantus “Zorro” who competed at many International Grand Prix as well as the Olympics. Performance levels are set by individual registries to meet approval requirements in lieu of a sports test such as we are attending.
The format for how a stallion is tested has changed over the years in Europe as well as here in North America. Registries like the American Hanoverian Society and Oldenburg Horse Breeders Society enjoy and want to maintain full reciprocity with their European counterparts and therefore need to subject these young stallions to the same standards. The current stallion testing takes place at the North American Stallion Sport Test (NASST) held each year on both the East Coast and one on the West coast. The test is a 3 day format that each stallion must attend and pass in two different years. This short test format puts more pressure on the owner to prepare the stallion to a high level for testing and requires the stallions own rider/trainer to show the stallion at the beginning of the test in addition to the test riders. All test riders and judges are qualified by the German National Federation to assure the same level of testing as done in Germany. Because this test is maintaining a high standard all major registries in the USA accept this new form of "Short Test" as a means to achieve a stallion's lifetime approval.
An example of how the licensing and sport testing process would work for a stallion would be as follows:
* Age 3: The stallion is presented for licensing. If accepted, he is granted a 1-year breeding permit to breed mares at age 4.
* Age 4: The stallion must attend a 3-day sport test. If he successfully passes (a score of 7.5 overall is required by the AHS, OHBS, HV), then he is granted another 1-year breeding license to breed mares at age 5.
* Age 5: The stallion attends his second 3-day sport test. If he successfully passes, then he receives his Lifetime approval.
Each stallion is presented at the test in their discipline, Dressage or Jumpers. The requirements for each age group is listed below.
* 4-Year Old Stallions
USEF Four-Year Old Test
Course of 1.0 meters
* 5-Year Old Stallions
FEI Five-Year Old Test
Course of 1.1 meters
* 6-Year Old Stallions
FEI Six-Year Old Test
Course of 1.2 meters
The North American Sport Test is recognized by the following registries
*American Hanoverian Society, Hanoverian Verband, Rhineland Studbook
*German Oldenburg Verband
*American Trakehner Association
*Westphalian/RPSI
*ISR/Oldenburg NA
*Holsteiner Verband.
Eurequine Owner and American Hanoverian Society President Edgar Schutte, along with other members of the AHS, HV and GOV, formed the committee which brought this event to North America. The continued growth in participants and enthusiasm from spectators is exciting for us from this perspective as well as for the continued growth of the Sporthorse in America.
Follow our Instagram and Facebook stories for coverage of the NASST.

Wednesday, November 6, 2019

North American Stallion Sport Test 2019 Results

The North American Stallion Sport Test concluded for 2019 on November 4. Hilltop Farm's part of the Test was held October 29–31 in Colora, Maryland; the West Coast location was Pollyrich Farm, Solvang, California, where the Test was held November 2–4.

Stallions were presented in their chosen discipline, dressage or jumping. They were ridden by their own rider and also a Test rider, and evaluated in both schooling and test sessions over the three days. A final score of 7.5 was need to pass. Here are the final results divided by discipline.

Dressage Stallions



Jumping Stallions



Tuesday, November 5, 2019

Evaluation of Conformation of Horse Emoji

As breeders, we spend a lot of time evaluating horse conformation. It is a serious part of the core of a breeder's business. But what about horse emoji? Wait, what?



There are more! By someone on Twitter called Horse Girl Autumn, who has created this brilliantly funny critique of the conformation of horse emoji. If you haven't seen this, click here to read. Enjoy!

Friday, October 25, 2019

North American Stallion Sport Test 2019 Schedule

The North American Stallion Sport Test has just released the daily schedules for the testing at both locations. The event will be held at Hilltop Farm in Colora Maryland on October 29–31, and at Pollyrich Farms in Solvang California on November 2–4. 



The following events are open to spectators.  Highlights include Day 2 which has public commentary by the judges on each horse, and Day 3 which includes the Guest Rider exam and final scores for all the horses. We hope you can join us!


East Coast: Hilltop Farm


October 29th - Vet Check AM, Observed Schooling PM

8:30am Vet Check
11:00-11:45am Private Lunch for Stallion Owners & Registry Officials   
11:45-2:15pm Schooling Sessions (Dressage)
2:15-4:45pm Schooling Sessions (Jumper)

7:00pm Dinner for Stallion Owners & Registry Officials (offsite)


October 30th - Observed Schooling AM, Testing PM

8:30-9:45am Schooling Sessions (Dressage)
10:45-12:00pm Schooling Sessions (Jumper)
12:00-1:00pm Lunch ($15) Please RSVP by Monday 10/21 to holly@hilltopfarminc.com
1:00-2:15pm Jumper Test

3:15-4:30pm Dressage Test


October 31st - Guest Rider, Licensings

8:30-10:10am Guest Rider (Dressage)
11:10-1:10pm Guest Rider (Jumper)
1:10-2:00pm Lunch ($15) Please RSVP by Monday the 21st to holly@hilltopfarminc.com
2:00 pm Announcement of Stallion Test Results
           Followed by GOV, AHS/HV, & Westfalen Registry Licensings


West Coast: Pollyrich Farms


November 2nd  - Vet Check PM, Observed Schooling PM

12:00pm Vet Check
1:30-2:00pm Schooling Sessions (Dressage)
2:00-4:00pm Schooling Sessions (Jumper)

November 3rd - Observed Schooling AM, Testing PM

10:00-10:15am Schooling Sessions (Dressage)
10:30-11:30am Schooling Sessions (Jumper)
11:30am-12:30pm Lunch
12:30-1:50pm Jumper Test
2:00-2:20pm Dressage Test

5:30 Wine Tastings, Followed by Dinner Party - $50/ticket all-inclusive.
Please RSVP by Monday, October 28th to BuffyOas@me.com

November 4th - Guest Rider AM, Licensing PM

9:00-9:20am Guest Rider (Dressage)
9:30am-11:00am Guest Rider (Jumper)
11:30am Announcement of Stallion Test Results
           Followed by GOV, AHS/HV, & Westfalen Registry Licensings



*NOTE that these schedules are tentative!


For more information, please click here to visit the North American Sport Test website.


Friday, October 18, 2019

Foundation Sire: Gotthard

Here is the next installment of Warmblood Stallions of North America’s Foundation Friday.  Every other Friday we will be featuring a foundation sire - one who has been influential in the development of warmblood breeds. We pull from the incredible archive of The Horse Magazine, published by Chris Hector of Australia. Thank you, Chris, for permission to draw on your expertise!


1949–1978

164 cm
Grey
Breeder: Richard Kords


Gotthard is one of those stallions who barely got approved, but went on to have a profound impact on sport horse breeding. "Gotthard almost didn’t make it as a stallion – he really doesn’t look that appealing as a younger horse…"

Typically, a great stallion leaves stallion sons behind to carry his legacy. Gotthard didn't leave particularly successful breeding stallions - but he did leave successful broodmares and successful competitors. It wasn't until 1970 that his daughter Goldika started to make her mark - "That year, Goldika won a total of 17 ‘S’ classes, including three Nations Cups!" Then breeders started using Gotthard!

His biggest success, however, has been as a sire of broodmares. "Even though Gotthard never really established a stallion line, it is impossible to ignore him; there are just too many influential modern stallions with Gotthard on their dam line to leave him out. ... Through mares like Goldret, he had a crucial rôle in the shaping of the modern performance horse."

Gotthard "was to produce over fifty horses that went on to compete internationally and when, in 1975, a list of top stallions was published, Gotthard was number one in terms of prize money. ..."


To read the entire article, with pedigree, details of Gotthard's sons and daughters, on the Horse Magazine website, click here.

There are a few of stallion descendants of Gotthard in North America. Click on the following links to read about each of the ones on WarmbloodStallionsNA.com:


Friday, October 4, 2019

Foundation Sire: Le Tot de Sémilly

Here is the next installment of Warmblood Stallions of North America’s Foundation Friday.  Every other Friday we will be featuring a foundation sire - one who has been influential in the development of warmblood breeds. We pull from the incredible archive of The Horse Magazine, published by Chris Hector of Australia. Thank you, Chris, for permission to draw on your expertise!

1977–2009
167 cm
Chestnut
Breeder: Jules Mesnildrey
Stood at Haras de Couvains


The fantastic success of the French all-stallion showjumping team at the 2002 WEG in Jerez put the focus back very firmly on French blood and none was more representative of the Selle Français heritage than Le Tot de Sémilly.
Like so many stallions, Le Tot de Sémilly is bound up with the fortunes of one horse breeding family, in this case the Levallois family. ...
Germain Levallois purchased the Grand Veneur foal out of Venue de Tot and christened him Le Tot de Sémilly, and gave him to his son Eric to ride. Le Tot was a powerful horse, but they grew together. From their first season together, the whole world wanted to buy the stallion, the Federation, the Americans…


To read the entire article, with pedigree, details of Le Tot de Sémilly's sons and daughters, on the Horse Magazine website, click here.

There are a few of stallion descendants of Le Tot de Sémilly in North America. Click on the following links to read about each of the ones on WarmbloodStallionsNA.com: